Tag: performance engineering maturity

Part 3 – Performance Engineering Maturity Model at Work

There is no business which should treat performance as an afterthought because slow loading or not responding applications can quickly have an impact on financial revenue. Unsatisfied users will most likely not return and will continue with other more reliable services. Therefore, I highly recommend integrating performance aspects into your development chain.

In this blog post, I will outline activities which help you to improve the performance of your business applications. The chart below outlines nine practices of the performance engineering maturity model and each practice is split up in three activities across the maturity levels. Low maturity level activities are less effective and easier to implement.

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Part 2 – How to bring the Performance Engineering Maturity Model into play

Whenever an application doesn’t fulfill performance requirements, it’s clear that something went wrong and the root-cause analysis can be very challenging. Based on my experience a proactive approach is much better because this gives confidence and prevents you from frustrated users due to not responding applications.

As already mentioned in my previous post I’ve created a performance engineering maturity model which provides the required transparency about best practices in this discipline. Obviously, there is no need that all companies reach the highest level in all available performance engineering subjects. Therefore, I use a maturity level based approach which allows a tailor-made adoption and improvement over time. In this post, I will outline the three domains and nine practices of this maturity model.

Part 1 – Introducing a Performance Engineering Maturity Model

Speed is everything, but not everything is speed. Nobody enjoys slow loading or erroneous applications, and bad user experience has already a significant impact on commercial revenue. I’m still wondering that the average response time of mobile sites is 19 seconds. Personally, speaking I won’t wait more than 5 seconds for a page to load.

I’ll give you now some simple steps you can use right away to identify blind spots in your software development chain which holds you back from providing a better user experience. There are different approaches, but I’ve decided to use a maturity level based method because this allows a tailor-made, step-by-step improvement over time.